WWI Conference

The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, and the France/Texas A&M University Institute present a two-day conference:

1917: A Global Turning Point in History and Memory

Wednesday, March 1 – Thursday, March 2, 2017
Location: Annenberg Presidential Conference Center • Directions

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Conference schedule →
Presenter bios →

Sponsored by:
Glasscock Center
Scowcroft Institute
France/TAMU Institute

Participants:
Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau | Director, School for Advance Studies in the Social Science (EHESS)
Brett Bowles | Associate Professor of French, Adjunct Associate Professor of History, Indiana University Bloomington
Elizabeth Cobbs | Professor and Melbern G. Glasscock Chair in American History, Texas A&M University
Mark E. Grotelueschen | Lt. Col. and Professor of History at United States Air Force Academy
Paul Jankowski | Professor of History, Brandeis University
Charlotte Ku | Professor of Law and Associate Dean of International Programs, Texas A&M University School of Law
Adam Seipp | Professor of History, Texas A&M University
Nicolas Werth | Research Director, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS); Senior Fellow, Institute of Contemporary History (IHTP), Paris


Conference Schedule:

Day One • Wednesday, March 1, 2017

9:00-10:00 • Breakfast (Room 1011C)

10:00-12:00 • Session One (Hagler Auditorium) | Chair: Dr. Sarah M. Misemer
Adam Seipp – “‘Hold On’ is the Order of the Day: Consent and Dissent in Wartime Europe”
Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau – “An Artifact of War Carved in 1917: The Trench Cane of Soldier/Peasant Claude Burloux”
Brett Bowles – “The Aesthetics and Politics of Wartime Poster Art: an International Overview”

12:00-2:00 • Lunch Break

2:00-4:00 • Session Two (Hagler Auditorium) | Chair: Dr. Brian Linn
Mark Grotelueschen – “Decisive Factor or Junior Partner? The American Contribution to Allied Victory in the Great War”
Elizabeth Cobbs – “Fighting on Two Fronts: Women’s Suffrage World War I, and Jack Pershing’s ‘Hello Girls’ at Meuse-Argonne”
Charlotte Ku – “1917: Laying the Foundation for Global Order”

Day Two • Thursday, March 2, 2017

9:00-10:00 • Breakfast (Room 1011C)

10:00-12:00 • Session Three (Hagler Auditorium) | Chair: Dr. Terry Anderson
Nicolas Werth – “Russia 1917: A Soldier’s Revolution”
Paul Jankowski – “The War Between The Wars: Looking Back on 1917 and American Entry During the Interwar Years”

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Presenter Bios

Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau is directeur d’études at the Ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales (EHESS, Paris). He is a specialist of the First World War, but his recent research focuses on the historical anthropology of war phenomenon in contemporary times, including the Rwandan Tutsi genocide.

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Brett Bowles is an Associate Professor of French and an Adjunct Associate Professor of History at Indiana University, Bloomington. He has an interdisciplinary academic background, combining a B.A. and M.A. in French Language and Literature from the University of Virginia with a Ph.D. in French Civilization from Pennsylvania State University. His primary research field is twentieth-century social, political, and cultural history through film (fiction and documentary), with a focus on the 1930s and 40s. Professor Bowles is an associate editor of The Historical Journal of Film, Radio, and Television, as well as an editorial board member for French History and French Historical Studies. He also works with International Historic Films in Chicago as an academic advisor and producer of DVDs related to France during the Second World War.

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Elizabeth Cobbs earned her Ph.D. in American history from Stanford University. She now holds the Melbern Glasscock Chair at Texas A&M University and a Research Fellowship at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution. Her books have won four literary prizes, two for American history and two for fiction. Elizabeth has been a Fulbright scholar in Ireland and a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. She has served on the Historical Advisory Committee of the U.S. State Department and on the jury for the Pulitzer Prize in History. She is the co-producer and screenwriter of American Umpire, a documentary airing nationwide on American Public Television. Her most recent publication, The Hamilton Affair, is a novel based on the remarkable life of Alexander Hamilton and his courageous wife Eliza Schuyler.

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Mark E. Grotelueschen received his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University in 2003. He is currently an active duty Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Air Force, as well as a Professor of History at the United States Air Force Academy, where he is a Senior Military Faculty member and Chief of the Military History Division in the Department of History. He teaches courses in military, African, American, and world history.  He is the author of The AEF Way of War: The American Army and Combat in World War I (2007). The book examines the American Expeditionary Forces’ (AEF) combat doctrine and shows how AEF units fought on the Western Front during WWI.

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Paul Jankowski is a Professor of History at Brandeis University. His teaching areas are the history of modern Europe and of France in particular, as well as the history of wars and warfare, especially those of the twentieth century, in Europe since the Middle Ages. He authored the award-winning book, Verdun: The Longest Battle of the Great War (2014). He has given talks at the French Embassy cultural service in New York, the French Consulate in Boston, the Public Library in Arlington, Virginia, and the World War I Historical Association in Norfolk, Virginia and has been interviewed by various European publications. His most recent publication “Operation Gericht” was published in Desperta Feero Contemporanea.

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Charlotte Ku is a Professor and Associate Dean for Global Programs at Texas A&M University School of Law. Her research interests include how law operates as a social phenomenon not necessarily dependent on formal structures or institutions. She is particularly interested in understanding the structures and processes that facilitate the development and implementation of international law. Prior to academia, she was a legislative staffer in the U.S. Senate, worked for a community foundation, and served as a senior executive of an academic association.

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Adam Seipp is a Professor in the Department of History at Texas A&M University who specializes in European War and Society, German history and Transnational history.  Seipp’s research focuses on war and social change in modern Germany, particularly the period since 1945.  His recent publications include a book, Strangers in the Wild Place: Refugees, Americans, and a German Town, 1945-1952 (2013) and two articles: “Buchenwald Stories: Testimony, Military History, and the American Encounter with the Holocaust” in the Journal of Military History (July 2015) and “The Driftwood of War: The US Army, Expellees, and West German Society, 1945-1952” in War and Society (October 2013). He is currently working on two research projects.  The first is a social history of the American military presence in the Federal Republic of Germany from 1945-1995. The second examines the role of testimony in shaping narratives of concentration camp liberation in the United States and Germany.

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Nicolas Werth, Research Director at the Institut d’Histoire du Temps Présent (CNRS) in Paris, is a specialist on Soviet history, especially Stalinism. He is the author of the part on USSR of The Black Book of Communism (1998), and of Cannibal Island (2007). Among his numerous books are: La terreur et le désarroi. Staline et son système (2007), Histoire de l’Union soviétique. De l’Empire russe à la CEI, 1900-1991 (7th edition, 2012), La route de la Kolyma (2012), Les révolutions ruses (2017). Forthcoming: Anthologie du Goulag, with Luba Jurgenson (2017).

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