Faculty Colloquium Series: Albert Broussard

“Western Civil Rights Since 1970”

Tuesday, 11 April 2017, 4-5 p.m.
Location: 311 Glasscock  Building
The paper is available to members of the Center’s listserv, or by contacting the Glasscock Center by phone at (979) 845-8328 or by e-mail at glasscock@tamu.edu.

ASB_120x180Albert Broussard | Professor, Department of History, 2016-17 Glasscock Faculty Research Fellow, Texas A&M University

Dr. Albert Broussard is a professor of History and a Cornerstone Faculty Fellow at Texas A&M University, where he specializes in Afro-American history. Broussard has authored six books, the most recent titled Expectations of Equality: A History of Black Westerners, which investigates life for African Americans in the West from the 16th century to the turn of the 21st century through delving into the personal lives of everyday men and women.

Abstract:
Dr. Broussard will conduct research on racial activism in the western states and territories from the conclusion of World War II to 1980, years of profound change in race relations and American society. Broussard has selected these years, because they have traditionally been neglected by historians, but also because they dovetail with a large body of new scholarship on the national civil rights movement. More specifically, Broussard’s research will examine the formation of alliances among diverse racial and ethnic groups, an acceleration of protest against segregation and discrimination, the formation of new protest organizations in the west such as CORE,, political empowerment, and the awakening of student activism in western cities and on college campuses.  This study will focus broadly on the states and territories located west of the ninety-eighth meridian, including Alaska and Hawaii.

The Faculty Colloquium offers faculty an opportunity to discuss a work-in-progress with colleagues from different disciplines. By long-standing practice, colloquium presenters provide a draft of their current research, which is made available to members of the Glasscock Center listserv. Each colloquium begins with the presenter’s short (10-15 minute) exposition of the project, after which the floor is open for comments and queries. The format is by design informal, conversational, and interdisciplinary.

The Glasscock Center extends a warm invitation to faculty and students to join in a discussion of Professor Broussard’s work-in-progress. The paper is available to members of the Center’s listserv, or by contacting the Glasscock Center by phone at (979) 845-8328 or by e-mail at glasscock@tamu.edu. To join the Center’s listserv and receive regular notices of colloquia and other events, please register at http://listserv.tamu.edu/archives/chr-l.html.