All posts by Donna Malak

Lecture by Alice Kaplan on Albert Camus’ “The Stranger”

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Monday, October 24, 2016 4 p.m. (Reception at 3:30)
Location: 311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University

Alice Kaplan
John M. Musser Professor of French, Yale University

Catherine Hélie, Editions Gallimard
Catherine Hélie, Editions Gallimard

The Stranger was  published in 1942, in the depths of the Nazi Occupation, by a young unemployed journalist from Algeria who would normally never have had a hearing in Paris.  In my lecture, I will explore the making of this phenomenal literary success:  Camus’ initial failure as novelist, his search for a new style, the odyssey of his manuscript and the conditions of its publication. That this strange book should become the best known French novel in the United States and still the most widely taught, that it changed the whole direction of the novel, here and in France… that is, in literary terms, a miracle.

About the Presenter
Alice Kaplan, John M. Musser Professor of French, joined the faculty at Yale in 2009 after many years on the faculty at Duke University, where she was the founding director of the Duke University Center for French and Francophone Studies and a professor of Romance Studies, Literature, and History. Her first book, Reproductions of Banality (1986), was a theoretical exploration of French fascism. Since then she has published books on Céline’s anti-semitic pamphlets (Sources et citations dans ‘Bagatelles pour un massacre’), on the treason trial of Robert Brasillach (The Collaborator: The Trial and Execution of Robert Brasillach), and on American courts-martial in newly liberated France (The Interpreter). The Interpreter was the recipient of the 2005 Henry Adams Prize from the Society for History in the Federal Government; The Collaborator was awarded the 2001 Los Angeles Times Book Award in History and was a finalist for the National Book Award and National Book Critic’s Circle awards. She is probably best known for her memoir, French Lessons (1993), which was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle award in biography/autobiography. Her literary translations include books by Roger Grenier (Piano Music for Four Hands, Another November, and The Difficulty of Being a Dog), Louis Guilloux (OK, Joe), and Evelyne Bloch-Dano (Madame Proust). Her newest book, Dreaming in French: The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis (2012), was published by the University of Chicago Press and the Editions Gallimard. Current research interests include World War II and post-war France, literature and law, biography/autobiography, and French cultural studies.

Support provided by:
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire


Directions and Parking:
311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4214
MAP

The closest parking is in the Central Campus Garage (CCG) on the campus of Texas A&M University. Enter on Spence Street from Lubbock Street. Proceed through gate (gate will lift automatically). Proceed through stop sign. Turn left into Central Campus Garage entrance and take a ticket at the gate.
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Google Maps directions from intersection of University Dr. and Texas Ave. to Central Campus Garage (CCG).

The Archaeology of the Ancient Temple of Apollo at Claros Turkey

Tuesday, 5 April 2016, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University

The colloquium is the product of a collaboration between researchers at INA/TAMU and the Institute de Recherche sur l’Architecture Antique at the Université Lumière Lyon 2 in France. It is made possible by a grant from the Partner University Fund, the French-American Cultural Exchange, and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The provisional schedule of papers is:

1) “The Temple of Apollo at Claros from its Beginnings in the Late Fourth Century B.C.,” Jean-Charles Moretti (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique / Université Lumière Lyon 2)

2) “The Evolution of the Temple of Apollo During Hellenistic and Roman Times,” Nicolas Bresch (Institute de Recherche sur l’Architecture Antique / Université Lumière Lyon 2 in France)

3) “The Excavation, Recovery, and Analysis of a Shipwrecked Marble Column Destined for the Temple of Apollo,” Deborah Carlson (Institute of Nautical Archaeology / Nautical Archaeology Program, Texas A&M University)

All are welcome to attend and encouraged to meet our visiting French scholars, who are widely regarded as experts in the field of ancient architecture.

Conference on Foreigners and Outsiders in Modern European Culture

Wednesday, 13 April 2016, 9:15 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University

About the Conference →
Schedule →
Presenters (bios and abstracts) →
Conference Registration →

About the Conference

Coming soon…

Conference sponsored by:
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Texas A&M University Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS)
Department of International Studies

Conference Schedule:

All events in room 311 Glasscock Building, unless otherwise noted.

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

9:1510:00            Breakfast

10:00-12:00          Session 1 • Chair: Apostolos Vasilakis, Instructional Assistant Professor, Department of English, Texas A&M University

Rob Zaretsky (University of Houston): “The View from Bodrum: Herodotus, Aylan Kurdi and Us”

Susan Rubin Suleiman (Harvard University, TIAS Faculty Fellow): “Foreigners and Strangers: Jews in France between the two World Wars”

Atina Grossmann (The Cooper Union): “From Survivor to Displaced Person to ‘Homeless Foreigner’: Refugee Jews in Postwar Germany”

12:00-1:30            Lunch break

1:30-3:30              Session 2 • Chair: TBD

Lia Brozgal (University of California Los Angeles): “Not Quite White, Surely Not Black: Negotiations of Visible Difference in France”

Bob Shandley (Texas A&M University): “The Racialization of Migration Politics in Germany”

Dinah Hannaford (Texas A&M University): “‘Useful Invaders’: Contemporary African Migration to Europe”

3:30-4:00              Coffee & cookie break

4:00-5:00              Artist’s Presentation

Ken Aptekar: Slideshow and discussion of his current art exhibit in Lübeck, Germany, “Nachbarn: Neighbors in a German Town”

5:00-5:30             Wrap-up discussion

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Presenters:

Rob Zaretsky, University of Houston
“The View from Bodrum: Herodotus, Aylan Kurdi and Us”

Bio coming soon…

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Susan Rubin Suleiman, Harvard University, TIAS Faculty Fellow
“Foreigners and Strangers: Jews in France between the two World Wars”

Bio coming soon…

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Atina Grossmann, The Cooper Union
“From Survivor to Displaced Person to ‘Homeless Foreigner’: Refugee Jews in Postwar Germany”

Bio coming soon…

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Lia Brozgal, University of California Los Angeles
“Not Quite White, Surely Not Black: Negotiations of Visible Difference in France”

Bio coming soon…

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Bob Shandley, Texas A&M University)
“The Racialization of Migration Politics in Germany”

Bio coming soon…

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Dinah Hannaford, Texas A&M University)
“‘Useful Invaders’: Contemporary African Migration to Europe”

Bio coming soon…

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Ken Aptekar, artist
Slideshow and discussion of his current art exhibit in Lübeck, Germany, “Nachbarn: Neighbors in a German Town”

Bio coming soon…

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A Roundtable on Irène Némirovsky, Author of Suite Française

Tuesday, 29 March 2016, 4-5:30 p.m.
Reception at 3:30 p.m.
Glasscock Center Library, 311 Glasscock Building

SuitefrançaiseIrèneNémirovsky2004PANELISTS:
Susan Rubin Suleiman on Némirovsky’s Jewish Protagonists
C. Douglas Dillon Research Professor of the Civilization of France at Harvard University, 2015-16 TIAS Faculty Fellow

Olivier Philipponnat on Némirovsky and Catholicism
Author of The Life of Irène Némirovsky

Nathan Bracher on Némirovsky’s Fiction and History
Professor of French in the Department of International Studies at Texas A&M University

Irène Némirovsky (1903-1942) was a novelist of Ukrainian Jewish origin born in Kiev under the Russian Empire. Regardless of living more than half her life in France and writing in French, she was denied French citizenship. Némirovsky was arrested by the Nazis as a Jew under the racial laws, which did not take into account her conversion to Roman Catholicism. She died at Auschwitz at the age of 39. Némirovsky is now best known for the posthumously-published Suite française.

Suggested Reading
There will be plenty of opportunity for discussion. Preparatory readings including:
Suite française by Irène Némirovsky
David Golder by Irène Némirovsky

Lecture supported in part by:
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)

ABOUT THE PANELISTS:

ssuleiman_120x160SUSAN RUBIN SULEIMAN is the C. Douglas Dillon Research Professor of the Civilization of France at Harvard University. Considered one of the leading U.S. scholars of twentieth-century French literature, Susan R. Suleiman ranks among the world’s foremost scholars in her field and is considered a leading international scholar of gender and Holocaust studies.

Among her works is the 1983 Authoritarian Fictions: The Ideological Novel as a Literary Genre, one of the most important critical studies on the political novel written over the last four decades.

She received the Radcliffe Medal for Distinguished Achievement in 1990 and a decoration by the French government as an Officer of the Order of Academic Palms (Palmes Académiques) in 1992.

Suleiman is the author or editor of many books and more than one hundred articles on contemporary literature and culture published in the United States and abroad. Her latest book, forthcoming from Yale University Press, is about the Russian-French novelist Irène Némirovsky and issues of “foreignness” in twentieth-century France. Her other books include Crises of Memory and the Second World War (2006); Subversive Intent: Gender, Politics, and the Avant-Garde (1990); Risking Who One Is: Encounters with Contemporary Art and Literature (1994); and the memoir Budapest Diary: In Search of the Motherbook (1996). She has edited and coedited influential collective volumes, including French Global: A New Approach to Literary History (2010) and After Testimony: The Ethics and Aesthetics of Holocaust Narrative for the Future (2012).

philipponnat_120x160OLIVIER PHILIPPONNAT, a French writer, editor and critic, was born in Épernay in 1967. Along with Patrick Lienhardt, he wrote of a biography of Roger Stéphane (Grasset, 2004), a French resistant, writer and journalist. For their biography of Irène Némirovsky (Grasset & Denoël, 2007), they have had unprecedented access to unpublished letters, notebooks and archives. The book has since been translated into English, Spanish, German, Italian, and Chinese.

Philipponnat was the curator of the exhibition Irène Némirovsky in the Memorial of Holocaust, Paris (2010). He also has written introductions for several unreleased stories and novels about Némirovsky and prepared the first edition of her complete works for La Pochothèque (2 vol., 2011), as well as a volume of eight biographies by Stefan Zweig (2014).

He is now preparing a collection of Némirovsky’s correspondence, and a detailed biography of the French writer, polemist and journalist Emmanuel Berl (forthcoming, 2017).

bracher-n_120x160NATHAN BRACHER is Professor of French at Texas A & M University. His book François Mauriac on Race, War, Politics, and Religion was published by the Catholic University of America Press in December 2015, while After the Fall:  War and Occupation in Irène Némirovsky’s Suite française, appeared from the same press in 2010. His recent articles include “L’Histoire hors sujet ou Écrire le passé “comme Elstir peignait la mer”: le cas de l’Histoire des grands-parents que je n’ai pas eus d’Ivan Jablonka,” published in 2015 inModern & Contemporary France, and  “Pour une histoire à l’imparfait du présent: La Dernière Catastrophe d’Henry Rousso,” published in 2015 in French Cultural Studies. His current research focuses on the intersections of history and the contemporary French novel.

Lecture by Author Pierre Lemaitre

Wednesday, 23 September 2015, 4-5 p.m. 

Lecture and reading in French . Q&A to follow in French and English.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building

pierre_lemaitrePIERRE LEMAITRE
Prix Goncourt-winning French Author
and Screenwriter

Born in Paris in 1951, Pierre Lemaitre has established himself as a standout writer of the French contemporary roman noir genre. His literary career is rather unusual: founder of a training agency, he used to teach American and French literature to librarians before dedicating himself, in his fifties, into the process of writing thrillers.

Since the publication of his first book Travail soigné in France in 2006, Lemaitre has been publishing novels at an astounding rate. By the time he was awarded the Goncourt, France’s most prestigious literary award, in 2013, for his novel Au revoir là-haut, he had seven books and numerous other awards under his belt.

A departure from his previous works, Au revoir là-haut is a picaresque novel featuring two former French soldiers of WWI, left behind in 1918, who manage to pull off a scam with fictitious war memorials.

51rNt+HbATL._SX333_BO1,204,203,200_Even before Lemaitre enjoyed a large success with Au revoir là-haut, he had won over many fans of the roman noir genre with his crime drama series about the detective Camille Verhœven, among other crime stories. For his crime novels alone he has been awarded eight literary prizes to date, including the Francophone Polar Prize (Robe de marié, 2009), and the European Polar Prize (Cadres noirs, 2010). His highly ingenious plots, combined with his stunning visual style–he prefers to use the word “scene” to the word “chapter” when discussing his books–have earned him the praise of critics and the public alike. To add to this relentless success, an American film adaptation of Pierre Lemaitre’s internationally bestselling thriller Alex, directed and produced by James B. Harris, and co-written by Lemaitre himself, was shot in Paris this autumn.A graphic novel adaptation of Au revoir là-haut,with illustrations by Christian De Metter, will be released in France in October by Rue de Sèvres.

His books are published by MacLehose Press in the US. The Great Swindle will be released on 22 September 2015.

“Pierre Lemaitre [is a] a really excellent suspense novelist,” according to Stephen King in the New York Times.

“[The Great Swindle is an] assured, somber exploration of post-WWI French society… Lemaitre captures the venal capitalism of the postwar period… Despite his unscrupulous scheme, Édouard proves impossible to dislike. His determination to play a great trick on the society that betrayed him is infectious, and readers cannot help rooting for his plans as they reach their dark, bizarrely joyous fruition.” – Publishers Weekly

Lecture supported in part by:
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research

Lecture with Two French Scholars

Wednesday, 22 April 2015, 4-5 p.m.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University
Lecture is free and open to the public.

“The Great War in France Today: A Look Back at the Centennial Year 2014”

STÉPHANE AUDOIN-ROUZEAU
Director, School for Advance Studies in the Social Science (EHESS)

“Remembering WWII: Heroes, Victims, Culprits”

HENRY ROUSSO
Director of Research, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS)


ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

audoin-rouzeau_120x160Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau is the director of the L’ecole des hautes etudes en sciences sociales (EHESS, Paris). His research focuses on the historical anthropology of war phenomenon in contemporary times and the Rwandan genocide.

 

rousso_120x160Henry Rousso is senior research fellow at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique, and member of the Institut d’histoire du temps présent (IHTP, Paris), that he directed from 1994 to 2005. He coordinates the European Network on Contemporary History (EURHISTXX), sponsored by the CNRS and a dozen of European Institutions and Universities. He is currently visiting professor at Yale University (Yale Program for the Study of Antisemitism).

Rousso’s works focus on the history and memory of traumatic pasts, especially World War II. His main books include: The Vichy Syndrome. History and Memory in France since 1944 (Paris: 1987, Cambridge: 1991);Vichy, An Ever-Present Past, with E. Conan (Paris: 1994, Hanover: 1998); The Haunting PastHistory, Memory, and Justice in France (Paris: 1998, Philadelphia, 2002); Stalinism and Nazism (Ed.) (Bruxelles: 1999, Lincoln, 2004); Vichy. L’Événement, la mémoire, l’histoire (Paris: 2001); Le dossier Lyon III. Le racisme et le négationnisme à l’université Jean-Moulin (Paris: 2004); Le Régime de Vichy (Paris 2007, Munich, 2009); Juger Eichmann, Jérusalem, 1961 (Paris,2011); and La dernière catastrophe.L’histoire, le présent, le contemporain (Paris, 2012, forthcoming).

“Corporeal Memory, Intellectual Memory” with Pascal Bruckner

Thursday, 16 April 2015, 4-5 p.m.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building, Texas A&M University
Lecture is free and open to the public.
© Irmeli Jung / Grasset
© Irmeli Jung / Grasset

PASCAL BRUCKNER
Essayist and Novelist

Pascal Bruckner is a world renowned essayist and novelist whose works have been translated in thirty countries. He has taught for fifteen years at the Institude d’Etudes Politiques in Paris and has been a visiting professor at New York University and at San Diego University. As a “public intellectual,” Bruckner has served as an expert commentator on French and European affairs for newspapers, reviews, and magazines around the world, including Le MondeLe Figaro, and Libération, as well as the New Yorker, the New Republic, and in the op-ed pages of the New York Times.

Bruckner’s latest book, The Paradox of Love (Princeton University Press, 2012), draws on history, politics, psychology, literature, pop culture, and current events. He has received numerous prestigious awards for his essays and novels, some of which include: Le Sanglot de l’Homme blanc (“The Tears of the White Man”); La Tentation de l’innocence (“The Temptation of Innocence”), which won the 1997 prix Medicis de l’essai; and La tyrannie de la penitence, which was translated in 2010 to The Tyranny of Guilt. In 1997, Bruckner’s novel Les voleurs de beauté (“Beauty Thieves”) was awarded the prix Renaudot, and in 2000, his essay L’Euphorie perpetuelle (“Perpetual Euphoria”) won the prix du Meilleur livre d’économie.

LECTURE SUPPORTED IN PART BY:
Cultural Services of the French Embassy
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs
Department of Philosophy


RELATED EVENT:

Wednesday, 15 April 2015, 6 p.m.
Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs Seminar
“Civil Society, Public Opinion, and the Russian Invasion of Ukraine”
Pascal Bruckner | Essayist and Novelist
Location: Annenberg Presidential Conference Center
RSVP here → 

“Charlie Hebdo, Anti-Semitism, and Immigration in France” with Annette Levy-Willard

Friday, 27 February 2015, 3-3:50 p.m.
Lecture in French and English. Event open to the public. During the INTS 205: Issues in International Studies class time.
Location: 100 Chemistry Building

annette-levy-willard

ANNETTE LEVY-WILLARD
French Reporter and Journalist

Annette Levy-Willard has been a reporter for the newspaper Libération since 1979. She was also a cultural counselor at the Embassy of France in Tel Aviv and the director French Institute in Isreal.  While she was aLibération correspondent in Los Angeles, she worked on assignments including the presidential campaign, September 11, and the the war in Iraq. She is the author of Trente-trois jours en été, chronique d’une guerre surprise (Laffont, 2007) Summer Rain (English translation, London), Chroniques de la guerre du sexe en Amérique (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Chroniques de Los Angeles (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Moi, Jane, cherche Tarzan(Flammarion, J’ai Lu), Emma Goldman, épopée d’une anarchiste (Hachette Littérature), and of De l’amour et des bombes  (réédition, André Versaille). Levy-Willard has also been a guest professor and lecturer at universities in the United States including UC Berkeley, Dartmouth, Rice University, Texas A&M University, and UT Austin.

Lecture supported in part by:
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
Department of International Studies

 

“Crimes Against Humanity in France” with Annette Levy-Willard

Thursday, 26 February 2015, 12:45-2 p.m.

Lecture in French and English.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building

annette-levy-willard

ANNETTE LEVY-WILLARD
French Reporter and Journalist

Annette Levy-Willard has been a reporter for the newspaper Libération since 1979. She was also a cultural counselor at the Embassy of France in Tel Aviv and the director French Institute in Isreal.  While she was aLibération correspondent in Los Angeles, she worked on assignments including the presidential campaign, September 11, and the the war in Iraq. She is the author of Trente-trois jours en été, chronique d’une guerre surprise (Laffont, 2007) Summer Rain (English translation, London), Chroniques de la guerre du sexe en Amérique (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Chroniques de Los Angeles (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Moi, Jane, cherche Tarzan(Flammarion, J’ai Lu), Emma Goldman, épopée d’une anarchiste (Hachette Littérature), and of De l’amour et des bombes  (réédition, André Versaille). Levy-Willard has also been a guest professor and lecturer at universities in the United States including UC Berkeley, Dartmouth, Rice University, Texas A&M University, and UT Austin.

Lecture supported in part by:
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
Department of International Studies

“French Women Today” with Annette Levy-Willard

Thursday, 26 February 2015
11:10 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.
Location: 311 Glasscock Building

annette-levy-willard

ANNETTE LEVY-WILLARD
French Reporter and Journalist

Annette Levy-Willard has been a reporter for the newspaper Libération since 1979. She was also a cultural counselor at the Embassy of France in Tel Aviv and the director French Institute in Isreal.  While she was aLibération correspondent in Los Angeles, she worked on assignments including the presidential campaign, September 11, and the the war in Iraq. She is the author of Trente-trois jours en été, chronique d’une guerre surprise (Laffont, 2007) Summer Rain (English translation, London), Chroniques de la guerre du sexe en Amérique (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Chroniques de Los Angeles (Grasset, Livre de Poche), Moi, Jane, cherche Tarzan(Flammarion, J’ai Lu), Emma Goldman, épopée d’une anarchiste (Hachette Littérature), and of De l’amour et des bombes  (réédition, André Versaille). Levy-Willard has also been a guest professor and lecturer at universities in the United States including UC Berkeley, Dartmouth, Rice University, Texas A&M University, and UT Austin.

Lecture supported in part by:
France/Texas A&M University Institute (Centre Pluridisciplinaire)
Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
Department of International Studies