Category Archives: Undergraduate

TAMU Faculty present at the Council on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference

Dr. Sarah M. Misemer (Glasscock Center for Humanities Research), Dr. Valerie Balester (University Writing Center), and Dr. Duncan MacKenzie (LAUNCH) lead a panel presentation at the recent Council on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference in Tampa, Florida. They discussed “Collaborative Undergraduate Humanities Research through Summer Seminars and Writing Communities.”

Presentation Abstract:
“In contrast to STEM disciplines at large research universities, undergraduate research in the humanities faces unique challenges: limited space and financial support, emphasis on individual scholarship, and restricted faculty availability in the summer. At Texas A&M only 6% of graduating senior humanities majors indicate that they have participated in faculty-mentored independent research compared to 15-25% of graduates in STEM colleges. In an effort to foster broader participation and greater visibility for undergraduate research in the humanities we have developed an innovative research program modeled on National Endowment for the Humanities seminars. Following two-week, intensive seminars around a common theme led by faculty in early summer, groups of 2-5 students develop independent research proposals. Students then transition into our established undergraduate research thesis program (traditionally dominated by STEM disciplines) and complete a formal research thesis and public presentation during the academic year. To support these collaborative groups of students addressing related research topics, we established a partnership among three campus programs: The Glasscock Center for the Humanities contributed space to build research communities, access to research-active faculty, and endowment support; the Undergraduate Research office provided structure for students to complete the formal research thesis; and the University Writing Center conducted summer writing studios to help students clarify their research questions and develop formal oral and written research proposals. In this presentation we will discuss pedagogical, cultural, legal, funding, and logistical challenges that were resolved during development of this program. By increasing the number of humanities theses completed, the Glasscock Summer Scholars program has successfully increased the visibility of humanities research on campus, positively impacted career plans of students as well as scholarly productivity of faculty, and provided a model for integrating diverse campus resources to promote undergraduate humanities research.”

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Dr. Sarah M. Misemer Selected for 2016 Unterberger Award

Dr. Sarah M. Misemer has been selected by LAUNCH (Honors and Undergraduate Research) at Texas A&M University to receive the 2016 Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education.

In 2004, the Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education was created and presented to Dr. Unterberger in recognition of her many years of service and significant contribution to the growth and development of high-impact education at Texas A&M.

LAUNCH: Honors extends a warm thank-you to Dr. Misemer for her contributions to Undergraduate Research and her support of students in the humanities! Dr. Misemer was recognized by Dr. Sumana Datta, executive director of LAUNCH, at the LAUNCH Recognition Ceremony in the MSC on Thursday, May 12th. Says Dr. Datta, “Dr. Misemer’s contributions to and support of Undergraduate Research as an administrator and her initiative in promoting and developing the Glasscock Undergraduate Summer Scholars program are changing the perceptions of how Humanities students can successfully experience these life-changing activities. Her care for our student’s well-being and their education is obvious and much appreciated.”

To see a list of previous recipients, visit the TAMU HUR Faculty Awards page.

misemer2013_smDr. Sarah M. Misemer is an associate professor in the Department of Hispanic Studies and the 2016 recipient of the Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education, which celebrates a faculty member’s commitment to Undergraduate Research. In 2004, the Unterberger Award was created and presented to Dr. Unterberger in recognition of her many years of service and significant contribution to the growth and development of honors education at Texas A&M.

Dr. Misemer has impacted research in the humanities at Texas A&M by establishing the Glasscock Undergraduate Summer Scholars program. Through this program, a tenured faculty member leads a two-week seminar on a specific topic, and students in the seminar develop a research question to study under the faculty member’s mentorship during the following eight weeks. In this second half of the program, students engage in peer writing activities at the Glasscock Center and in writing studios custom-designed for the program by the University Writing Center. The final outcome is students’ public presentations of their written proposals for future research through the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program. The faculty mentor meets with students every two weeks throughout the summer to guide the development of the project and then serves as the research advisor for students’ participation in the Undergraduate Research Scholars program the following year.

In addition to serving as the associate director of the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, Dr. Misemer is the author of Secular Saints: Performing Frida Kahlo, Carlos Gardel, Eva Perón, and Selena (Tamesis, 2008) and Moving Forward, Looking Back: Trains, Literature, and the Arts in the River Plate (Bucknell UP, 2010). Her publications on contemporary River Plate, Mexican, Spanish, and Latino theater have appeared in the journals Latin American Theatre Review, Gestos, Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Languages, and Hispanic Poetry Review, among many others. Additionally, Dr. Misemer’s work with the Latin American Theatre Review includes serving as the editor of its book series and on the editorial board of its journal. She is the past president and vice president of the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica. Dr. Misemer holds a PhD in Spanish from the University of Kansas and has been a professor at Texas A&M since 2004.

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Student Research Week Glasscock Award Winner to Present Research on 3 April 2015

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Dr. Sarah M. Misemer and Crystal Dozier

Crystal Dozier, PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and a winner of the Glasscock Award at Student Research Week 2015, will be presenting her research in an oral presentation on Friday, 3 April 2015 from 10:45-11:05 a.m. in 237 Anthropology Building. The Glasscock Award is meant to acknowledge exceptional interdisciplinary projects in the humanities. Awards for both oral and poster presentations are provided to undergraduate and graduate students.

ABSTRACT:
Concepts of race and ethnicity are undeniably some of the most important ideas confronted in anthropology. The American Anthropological Association, among many institutions, has publicly denounced race as a biological fact, yet this concept remains normative for large parts of the United States. Proper instruction in the concept of race as a historical and cultural construct can help combat implicit and explicit discrimination. This research project aims to assist collegiate instructors in choosing teaching methods that result in high retention of anthropological understandings of race. Presented here are the patterns in six sections of an introductory anthropology course, ANTH205: Peoples and Cultures of the World. Student learning was assessed through pre- and post-instruction questionnaires; students were asked basic questions about the nature of race as well as how they related to race in their own lives. Each course was taught by a different graduate instructor, who also reported their teaching methods. We compare the learning outcomes for the different class sections in order to understand what instructional methodologies, class formats, and demographics impact student learning. Analysis of over 200 student responses shows perceptions of race after instruction moved towards more anthropological conceptions in small, but significant, ways. Although our results are preliminary, classes that employed video within their lecture strategy, as well as classes that used a weekly reading quiz, had significantly more student change than those sections that did not. These results are consistent with current educational theory about student engagement and a reminder of the importance of reflective teaching practices.

Glasscock Center is Hiring Undergraduate Apprentices

The Glasscock Center is currently hiring undergraduate apprentices.  In addition to assisting with routine office tasks, apprentices are included in activities such as social events with visiting scholars, are encouraged to participate in the Center’s sponsored events as part of their work for the Center, and serve as liaisons with the undergraduate community on campus. Apprentices are encouraged to suggest programs, activities, projects, and funding opportunities that will benefit undergraduates. The Center’s staff is committed to involving the apprentices in the workings of the Center.

The Glasscock Center has three types of Undergraduate Apprentice positions. For more information about each position, please visit
http://glasscock.tamu.edu/grants-funding/glasscock-center-undergraduate-apprentices

Former Glasscock Undergraduate Scholar provides a glimpse into contemporary war

English graduate and 2012-13 Glasscock Undergraduate Scholar Stephen O’Shea’s essay on contemporary war was featured in the 5th volume of the undergraduate journal Explorations. Read more about his research from the College of Liberal Arts:
http://liberalarts.tamu.edu/html/news–english-graduate-grants-readers-a-glimpse-into-contemporary-war.html