Category Archives: Research

Stanford Humanities Faculty Fellowship Opportuny

The Stanford Humanities Center provides a collegial environment for faculty who are undertaking innovative projects in the humanities and humanistic social sciences.  Fellows participate in the intellectual life of the Humanities Center and the broader Stanford community, sharing ideas and work in progress with a diverse cohort of scholars and benefiting from a wide variety of campus resources.

Fellowship term: September 2017 – June 2018
Application deadline: October 5, 2016

Eligibility:
Applicants must have a PhD and be at least three years beyond receipt of the degree by the start of the fellowship term. The Center is open to projects employing information technology in humanities research.

For full eligibility requirements, see http://shc.stanford.edu/fellowships/non-stanford-faculty/

How to Apply:
Detailed instructions and a link to the online application are available at: http://shc.stanford.edu/fellowships/non-stanford-faculty/

If you have any further questions, please contact shc-fellowships@stanford.edu.

Call for Abstracts

The “Second International History of Medicine Symposium” is now accepting abstracts for their symposium which will be held February 24-25, 2017.  It’s goal is to highlight student research on the History of Medicine and related interdisciplinary areas  in both the sciences and the humanities. The program will include topnotch keynote speakers, awards for the best paper and poster in different categories, a reception, concerts, and a banquet. The venue will be TAMU HSC, College of Medicine, Bryan.

The Symposium is open to undergraduate, graduate/medical, and early post-graduate students at the Health Science Center College of Medicine, Nursing, School of Public Health, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine, One Health, Basic and Neurosciences, as well as Liberal Arts. Sessions can address a wide range of topics for a platform and/or poster presentation. Each student is expected to present an original critical interpretation and/or new methodological perspectives on the historical research topic. Faculty supervisors are encouraged to accompany their students.

The following link has more details about the format and submission process.
Call for Abstracts – History of Medicine Symposium

For further information, questions, or assistance with your topic, please contact russell@medicine.tamhsc.edu or alderete@medicine.tamhsc.edu

 

TAMU Faculty present at the Council on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference

Dr. Sarah M. Misemer (Glasscock Center for Humanities Research), Dr. Valerie Balester (University Writing Center), and Dr. Duncan MacKenzie (LAUNCH) lead a panel presentation at the recent Council on Undergraduate Research Biennial Conference in Tampa, Florida. They discussed “Collaborative Undergraduate Humanities Research through Summer Seminars and Writing Communities.”

Presentation Abstract:
“In contrast to STEM disciplines at large research universities, undergraduate research in the humanities faces unique challenges: limited space and financial support, emphasis on individual scholarship, and restricted faculty availability in the summer. At Texas A&M only 6% of graduating senior humanities majors indicate that they have participated in faculty-mentored independent research compared to 15-25% of graduates in STEM colleges. In an effort to foster broader participation and greater visibility for undergraduate research in the humanities we have developed an innovative research program modeled on National Endowment for the Humanities seminars. Following two-week, intensive seminars around a common theme led by faculty in early summer, groups of 2-5 students develop independent research proposals. Students then transition into our established undergraduate research thesis program (traditionally dominated by STEM disciplines) and complete a formal research thesis and public presentation during the academic year. To support these collaborative groups of students addressing related research topics, we established a partnership among three campus programs: The Glasscock Center for the Humanities contributed space to build research communities, access to research-active faculty, and endowment support; the Undergraduate Research office provided structure for students to complete the formal research thesis; and the University Writing Center conducted summer writing studios to help students clarify their research questions and develop formal oral and written research proposals. In this presentation we will discuss pedagogical, cultural, legal, funding, and logistical challenges that were resolved during development of this program. By increasing the number of humanities theses completed, the Glasscock Summer Scholars program has successfully increased the visibility of humanities research on campus, positively impacted career plans of students as well as scholarly productivity of faculty, and provided a model for integrating diverse campus resources to promote undergraduate humanities research.”

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Dr. Sarah M. Misemer Selected for 2016 Unterberger Award

Dr. Sarah M. Misemer has been selected by LAUNCH (Honors and Undergraduate Research) at Texas A&M University to receive the 2016 Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education.

In 2004, the Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education was created and presented to Dr. Unterberger in recognition of her many years of service and significant contribution to the growth and development of high-impact education at Texas A&M.

LAUNCH: Honors extends a warm thank-you to Dr. Misemer for her contributions to Undergraduate Research and her support of students in the humanities! Dr. Misemer was recognized by Dr. Sumana Datta, executive director of LAUNCH, at the LAUNCH Recognition Ceremony in the MSC on Thursday, May 12th. Says Dr. Datta, “Dr. Misemer’s contributions to and support of Undergraduate Research as an administrator and her initiative in promoting and developing the Glasscock Undergraduate Summer Scholars program are changing the perceptions of how Humanities students can successfully experience these life-changing activities. Her care for our student’s well-being and their education is obvious and much appreciated.”

To see a list of previous recipients, visit the TAMU HUR Faculty Awards page.

misemer2013_smDr. Sarah M. Misemer is an associate professor in the Department of Hispanic Studies and the 2016 recipient of the Betty M. Unterberger Award for Outstanding Service to Honors Education, which celebrates a faculty member’s commitment to Undergraduate Research. In 2004, the Unterberger Award was created and presented to Dr. Unterberger in recognition of her many years of service and significant contribution to the growth and development of honors education at Texas A&M.

Dr. Misemer has impacted research in the humanities at Texas A&M by establishing the Glasscock Undergraduate Summer Scholars program. Through this program, a tenured faculty member leads a two-week seminar on a specific topic, and students in the seminar develop a research question to study under the faculty member’s mentorship during the following eight weeks. In this second half of the program, students engage in peer writing activities at the Glasscock Center and in writing studios custom-designed for the program by the University Writing Center. The final outcome is students’ public presentations of their written proposals for future research through the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program. The faculty mentor meets with students every two weeks throughout the summer to guide the development of the project and then serves as the research advisor for students’ participation in the Undergraduate Research Scholars program the following year.

In addition to serving as the associate director of the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, Dr. Misemer is the author of Secular Saints: Performing Frida Kahlo, Carlos Gardel, Eva Perón, and Selena (Tamesis, 2008) and Moving Forward, Looking Back: Trains, Literature, and the Arts in the River Plate (Bucknell UP, 2010). Her publications on contemporary River Plate, Mexican, Spanish, and Latino theater have appeared in the journals Latin American Theatre Review, Gestos, Symposium: A Quarterly Journal in Modern Languages, and Hispanic Poetry Review, among many others. Additionally, Dr. Misemer’s work with the Latin American Theatre Review includes serving as the editor of its book series and on the editorial board of its journal. She is the past president and vice president of the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica. Dr. Misemer holds a PhD in Spanish from the University of Kansas and has been a professor at Texas A&M since 2004.

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Call for Paper Proposals – Studying Race Relationally

We invite paper proposals for an edited volume tentatively entitled Studying Race Relationallywhich will examine the relational nature of racial formations in the US, including both theoretical and empirically grounded work that moves beyond an analysis of how individual groups are formed in relation to whiteness to consider how they are formed in relation to one another. Authors of accepted proposals will be invited to participate in a conference at the University of Chicago on May 12-13, 2016 at which they will present, discuss, and further develop their papers for publication. Professor Claire Jean Kim will be our keynote speaker at the conference. 

Background:  Scholars across the humanities, social and natural sciences today commonly recognize and conceptualize race as a social construction shaped in specific historical, social and cultural contexts. Much of the scholarship in this field has focused on sustained analysis of individual racialized groups, shedding light on their particular role and standing within the hierarchy of race in the United States.

An emerging body of work has also begun to consider the relational nature of racializations moving beyond the analysis of how individual groups are formed in relation to whiteness to consider how they are formed in relation to each other. Relational studies of race posit that racialization happens dynamically; group-based racial constructions are formed not only in relation to whiteness, but also in relation to other devalued and marginalized groups (e.g. African Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and Asian Pacific Islanders), whose own racialization is itself constantly in play. By studying race relationally, scholars are able to make visible the connections among racialized groups and the logic that underpins the particular forms of inclusion and subordination they face. This process crosses both time and space. Even when groups do not directly interact they may be shaped by the same factors and phenomena that affect other racialized groups.

Working within this framework, for example, scholars have considered the interdependent racialization of African Americans and Chinese Americans in the U.S. South under Jim Crow. They have examined particular spheres of urban life–such as public health, law enforcement, housing, employment and cultural production—to understand the ways that racialized groups have interpreted and formed their identities, interests and power in relation to one another. They have come to understand the articulations between claims for tribal sovereignty and authority and Black political responses to vigilante violence and discrimination. 

Such work also bears directly on historic and contemporary policy debates. Relational frameworks can help explain why, for example, major federal initiatives such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or the War on Poverty that were conceived of within a black-white paradigm faced a particular set of challenges when applied to immigrant or refugee populations. They can help us understand how a contemporary debate about birthright citizenship and “anchor babies”—now imagined as a Mexican immigration issue—in fact operated in nearly identical terms one hundred years ago, but subjected Asian immigrants to the assault of this racial script. They permit us to imagine the way that immigrant groups’ experiences in the United States are shaped by the institutions and cultural understandings of race that immigrant and native-born groups before them faced.

We seek paper proposals around the following three themes as well as any others themes and topic appropriate to this project.

(1) Theories of Studying Race Relationally: What paradigms and frameworks are most productive to study race relationally? What is generative about studying race relationally? How do prevailing theories of racial formation, intersectionality, and social construction help to explain this process?

(2) Historical case studiesHow do historically grounded case studies demonstrate the theories of studying race relationally? How might it be productive, for example, to study Japanese internment and the Bracero Program together? Possible topics might include studies of race and space in multi-ethnic and racial areas, race and citizenship, or policies that affect racialized groups differently.

(3) Contemporary IssuesHow can scholarship within law, sociology, anthropology and other social sciences illuminate the relational dimensions of race? How can a relational approach light on the legal status and claims of Native American groups that have large numbers of Afro-descended members? How might it explain the dynamics of political conflict and cooperation in many US cities between long-standing Black and Latino/a communities?

Submissions: We welcome proposals from scholars of all ranks to contribute critical and innovative scholarship for consideration for the public conference and proposed publication. Selected participants will meet at the University of Chicago on May 12-13, 2016 to present their pre-circulated papers in a public forum. Travel, meals and housing will be provided for accepted participants. First drafts of papers are due one month before the conference, or on April 12, 2016. Participants will then be expected to revise their papers for publication, based on conference comments and feedback. 

Paper proposals should consist of a 500-800 word essay describing your project, the research thus far undertaken, and its connection to the conference and volume themes, along with a two-page CV.  These materials should be sent to each of the following conference organizers: Natalia Molina (nmolina@ucsd.edu), Ramón Gutiérrez (rgutierrez@uchicago.edu), Dan Martinez HoSang (dhosang@uoregon.edu), and Niels Hooper (niels.hooper@ucpress.edu) with the subject line “Studying Race Relationally.” Submissions must be received by January 8, 2016.

2015 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award Recipients Named

The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research and Texas A&M University’s Cushing Memorial Library and Archives are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2015 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award. The 2015 recipients are graduate students Kate Ozment and Hilary Anderson. This award supports research projects in the humanities that are based on the collections of the Cushing Memorial Library and Archives. The awards provide graduate students in the humanities with $2,000 to cover research expenses for projects based in the collections of Cushing Library. Both students will present their research at the Cushing Library in fall 2015.

Kate Ozment, PhD candidate in the Department of English, will work on a project titled, “The Page and the Stage: Women’s Commercial Writing in the Long Eighteenth Century.” This project examines the female author as she conceived herself as a commercial proprietor of a literary commodity in the long eighteen century in England. Of primary interest are investigations of why these writers made the decision to participate in multiple genres of commercial literature, specifically fiction and drama, and what monetary or social gains they envisioned they could amass. While at the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives, Kate will study the work of four authors: Aphra Behn, Delarivier Manley, Eliza Haywood, and Frances Burney. She hypothesizes that these authors saw fiction and drama as different but equally fruitful opportunities for commercial success, and she intends to discover what conclusion can be drawn about audience appetites and the commercial literary market from exploring authorial changes or adaptation between genres. In addition, Kate will explore what role the author plays in imagining expectations of genre when that position is complicated by the desires of a diverse reading public and the publisher.

Hillary Anderson, PhD candidate in the Department of History, will work on a project titled, “Radicalizing the South: Race and Sexuality in the 1970s Civil Rights Struggles.” This project focuses on the activism of and treatment of lesbians of color in civil rights movements during the 1970s. Contemporary documents as well as monographs in women’s history, women’s and gender studies, and sociology have noted the interplay of race and sex. Scholars assert that sexism existed in the civil rights and Black Power movements, as well as the movement for gay rights, and it is also argued that racism existed in the feminist and gay rights movements. In addition, some scholars contend that there was homophobia present in within Black Power and feminism. But often these works neglect the role that conceptions of sexuality played or they do not explain how race changed the equation of gender and sexuality. Hillary’s proposed research will examine more deeply these entanglements of race, gender, and especially sexuality as they affected the activism of African American lesbians in the South. In order to do so, she will make use of both the Africana Collection and the Don Kelly Collection of LGBTQ literature.

Applications will be accepted again spring 2016 for summer 2016. For further information visit http://glasscock.tamu.edu/grants-funding or contact the Glasscock Center at glasscock@tamu.edu or (979) 845-8328.

Full grant description →

Student Research Week Glasscock Award Winner to Present Research on 3 April 2015

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Dr. Sarah M. Misemer and Crystal Dozier

Crystal Dozier, PhD student in the Department of Anthropology and a winner of the Glasscock Award at Student Research Week 2015, will be presenting her research in an oral presentation on Friday, 3 April 2015 from 10:45-11:05 a.m. in 237 Anthropology Building. The Glasscock Award is meant to acknowledge exceptional interdisciplinary projects in the humanities. Awards for both oral and poster presentations are provided to undergraduate and graduate students.

ABSTRACT:
Concepts of race and ethnicity are undeniably some of the most important ideas confronted in anthropology. The American Anthropological Association, among many institutions, has publicly denounced race as a biological fact, yet this concept remains normative for large parts of the United States. Proper instruction in the concept of race as a historical and cultural construct can help combat implicit and explicit discrimination. This research project aims to assist collegiate instructors in choosing teaching methods that result in high retention of anthropological understandings of race. Presented here are the patterns in six sections of an introductory anthropology course, ANTH205: Peoples and Cultures of the World. Student learning was assessed through pre- and post-instruction questionnaires; students were asked basic questions about the nature of race as well as how they related to race in their own lives. Each course was taught by a different graduate instructor, who also reported their teaching methods. We compare the learning outcomes for the different class sections in order to understand what instructional methodologies, class formats, and demographics impact student learning. Analysis of over 200 student responses shows perceptions of race after instruction moved towards more anthropological conceptions in small, but significant, ways. Although our results are preliminary, classes that employed video within their lecture strategy, as well as classes that used a weekly reading quiz, had significantly more student change than those sections that did not. These results are consistent with current educational theory about student engagement and a reminder of the importance of reflective teaching practices.

Glasscock Center Announces Internal Faculty Residential Fellows for 2014-15

The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research has named four recipients of Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellowship for the 2014-2015 academic year. Recipients of the four annually awarded fellowships receive a one-course teaching release in the fall or spring semester of the fellowship year, a $1,000 research bursary, and an office in the Glasscock Center for the fellowship semester. These fellows will present and participate in the Faculty Colloquium Series during their fellowship semester.

Olga Dror is an associate professor in the Department of History. While in residence during the spring 2015 semester, Professor Dror will work on her monograph Raising Vietnamese: Youth Identities in North and South Vietnam during the War (1965-1975). This book considers the war-time problem of preserving Vietnamese identity in a new generation in a country flooded not only with foreign soldiers but also with foreign culture. It also poses a broader question about the importance of identifying who or what was considered an enemy of the Vietnamese. While youth are important for any society, their often unacknowledged role increases when a society is under stress, as it is through their participation in the present that the future is made. Consequently, bringing children into historical analysis is a way to understand what is most important in how adults think of the possibilities of their own lives. Professor Dror’s examination of youth identities during war time Vietnam will fill a significant gap in the pre-existing literature, offering new perspectives on the impact of American culture and the war on Vietnamese national identity.

Susan Egenolf is an associate professor in the Department of English. During her fall 2014 semester residence, Professor Egenolf will complete her monograph Josiah Wedgwood and the Cultivation of Romantic Taste. This book examines the contributions of Josiah Wedgwood, a master potter and entrepreneur, to the construction of late-eighteenth century and early nineteenth century aesthetics, and it argues that Wedgwood’s wares and his methods of marketing them influence the rise of neo-classicism and notions of the picturesque in British literature and art. The argument of this project depends heavily on illuminating the cultural and political contexts of Wedgwood’s life and work by uncovering specific historical details and artifacts related to that work, and this interdisciplinary study employs aesthetic theory, thing theory, gift theory, and art history to frame that argument. In the field of eighteenth century studies, this book will be the first extended study of the symbiotic relationship between Wedgwood’s methods and products and the literary productions of the late eighteen century.

Linda Radzik is a professor in the Department of Philosophy. During her spring 2015 semester residence at the Glasscock Center, Professor Radzik will finish her monograph, titled Moral Bystanders: On the Social Enforcement of Morality, which focuses on a common set of moral problems in order to explore deeper issues about the nature of responsibility and the meaning of community. The problem centers around a particular character—the moral bystander—who witnesses a wrongful act. While the moral bystander judges the act to be wrong, she is neither the perpetrator nor the victim, and she has no authority with regard to the situation. What should she do? What is she permitted to do? What might she be required to do? Using the standard methodology of analytic moral theory, Professor’s Radzik’s work poses a challenge to prevailing views about moral responsibility, and suggests that many of our practices for holding one another responsible are neither well understood nor justified. By considering the justification of informal, social forms of punishment and systematically addressing the role played by third parties to conflicts, this book will contribute in new ways to the literature on the issues that arise in the aftermath of wrongdoing.

Shelley Wachsmann is a professor in the Department of Anthropology. While in residence in the spring 2015 semester, Professor Wachsmann will continue researching and editing a book-length final excavation report on his work at Tantura Lagoon, Israel. This site and its surroundings have been inhabited almost continually for the past 4,000 years, and it has proven to be an ideal environment for shipwreck archaeology of the ancient world. The report, titled Dor/Tantura Lagoon: The Ancient & Medieval History of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea Written in Shipwrecks, will detail the findings of three extensive seasons of underwater exploration in Tantura Lagoon. The book-length report is envisioned as an innovative hybrid excavation report that will include a book linked to an open-access companion website allowing readers to explore the wrecks and artifacts in situ on their computers. This book will contribute significantly to our knowledge of Mediterranean history and archaeology, particularly during the critical period of the mid-first millennium AD.

The Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellows will discuss work completed during the fellowship in the Glasscock Center’s Morning Coffee Hour in in the 2015-16 academic year. The Glasscock Center accepts applications for Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellowships each spring semester. Applications will be accepted again in spring 2015 for the 2015-2016 academic year. For further information visit http://glasscock.tamu.edu/grants-funding or contact the Glasscock Center at glasscock@tamu.edu or (979) 845-8328.

Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award Call for Submissions

The Cushing Memorial Library & Archives and The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research invite applications for the 2014 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award. This graduate research award is open to Texas A&M University graduate students in good standing. It supports projects in the humanities that are based on collections housed at the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives. One or two awards of up to $2,000 each will be made.

Applications will be evaluated by a faculty committee and judged in part on their effective use of materials housed at Cushing. Recipients are expected to spend at least one month in residence at Cushing Library between 1 June and 31 August 2014, and they must deliver a short presentation on their projects during the fall semester of 2014. A written copy of the project must be deposited in the Glasscock Center Libraryand Cushing Memorial Library & Archives.

Deadline for applications is 25 March 2014.

Applications should be no longer than three single spaced pages, and they must contain the following information:

  • Applicant’s name, address, phone number and email address;
  • Applicant’s major degree and department;
  • Names of applicant’s department chair and committee chair;
  • Applicant’s expected graduation date;
  • Proposed project title;
  • A statement describing the nature of the applicant’s research, its relationship to the humanities, and the materials at Cushing that will support the research;
  • A tentative bibliography of Cushing materials.

Submit applications via email to Rebecca Hankins (rhankins@tamu.edu) in the form of an attached MS Word file or PDF (preferred) or to:

Cushing-Glasscock Humanities Research Award
c/o Rebecca Hankins
Cushing Memorial Library & Archives
Texas A&M University
TAMU 5000
College Station, TX 77843-5000

Please note that a No-Repeat Rule applies:

  • No one may receive more than one award in any three-year period.
  • If a graduate student who has won the Cushing-Glasscock Award submits another proposal after the three-year period has passed, the new project must be significantly different from the previous one.

Questions about papers and research can be directed to Rebecca Hankins at 979-845-1951 and rhankins@tamu.edu. We welcome your interest!

Former Glasscock Undergraduate Scholar provides a glimpse into contemporary war

English graduate and 2012-13 Glasscock Undergraduate Scholar Stephen O’Shea’s essay on contemporary war was featured in the 5th volume of the undergraduate journal Explorations. Read more about his research from the College of Liberal Arts:
http://liberalarts.tamu.edu/html/news–english-graduate-grants-readers-a-glimpse-into-contemporary-war.html