Category Archives: Call

Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award Call for Submissions 2017

Applications due by March 31, 2017

The Cushing Memorial Library and Archives and The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research invite applications for the 2017 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award. This graduate research award, open to Texas A&M University graduate students in good standing, supports projects in the humanities that are based on collections housed at the Cushing Memorial Library and Archives. One or two awards of up to $2,000 each will be made.

Applications will be evaluated by a faculty committee and judged in part on their effective use of materials housed at Cushing. Recipients must spend at least one month in residence at Cushing Library between  June 1 – August 31, 2017, and they must deliver a short presentation on their projects during the fall semester of 2017. A written copy of the project must be deposited in the Glasscock Center Library.

Applications should be no longer than three single spaced pages, and they must contain the following information:

  • Applicant’s name, address, phone number and email address
  • Applicant’s major degree and department
  • Names of applicant’s department chair and committee chair
  • Applicant’s expected graduation date
  • Proposed project title
  • A statement describing the nature of the applicant’s research, its relationship to the humanities, and the materials at Cushing that will support the research
  • A tentative bibliography of Cushing materials

Submit applications via email to David Z. Chroust in the form of an attached MS Word file or PDF (preferred) or to:

Cushing-Glasscock Humanities Research Award
c/o David Z. Chroust
Cushing Memorial Library & Archives
Texas A&M University
TAMU 5000
College Station, TX 77843-5000

Questions about papers and research can be directed to David Z. Chroust.

Please note that a No-Repeat Rule applies:

  1. No one may receive more than one award in any three-year period.
  2. If a graduate student who has won the Cushing-Glasscock Award submits another proposal after the three-year period has passed, the new project must be significantly different from the previous one.

More information →

“France on Campus Award” Call for Applications

The Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States, in partnership with Kickstarter, with support from NAFSA: Association of International Educators (NAFSA) and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU), has launched the second edition of the France on Campus Award under the patronage of film director Wes Anderson, to discover, celebrate and support initiatives that explore France in new and creative ways.

This Award is intended to help student organizations eager to launch or continue a major France-related project on campus by providing a unique package of funding, mentorship and networking. With this support, awardees will be expected to expose new audiences to France and French culture on their campus and beyond.

The Call for applications, attached above, is open until November 6, 2016. Please note that the call is not limited to student organizations with strong ties to France.

Application guidelines are available here
More information is available on the website of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy

Now Accepting Applications for Glasscock Endowed Directorship

Position Announcement

Glasscock Endowed Directorship, Glasscock Center for Humanities Research
College of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University 

The College of Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University invites applications for the newly endowed position of Director of the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, with a concurrent appointment as a tenured full professor in an academic unit within the college. The distinguished scholar and experienced administrator selected as first holder of the endowed Glasscock Directorship will enhance the national and international prominence of this successful and generously funded research center. The ideal candidate should hold a PhD or terminal degree in a humanities or relevant discipline; possess scholarly eminence; exhibit an energetic commitment to the humanities, strong communication skills, and a creative vision for the center; as well as the ability to engage faculty, students, and the public to realize that vision. The director oversees budgets and staff and should have experience managing various research activities, such as fellowships, conferences, lecture series, exhibits, and public outreach. The director typically teaches one course per year and is expected to maintain an active research agenda.

Growing from the Interdisciplinary Group for Historical Literary Studies founded in 1987, the Center for Humanities Research was approved by the Board of Regents of Texas A&M University in 1999 and received a named endowment in 2002.  The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research (http://glasscock.tamu.edu/) offers seminar grants, course development grants, funding for interdisciplinary working groups, publication support, travel grants, and various awards for research in the humanities. In addition, for nearly twenty years, the Glasscock Center has hosted lecture series, symposia, and conferences across a wide range of topics.

The College of Liberal Arts (http://liberalarts.tamu.edu/) is home to over 7,000 undergraduate and graduate student majors and approximately 450 faculty members across twelve departments. Texas A&M is a research-intensive, flagship, AAU university with more than 59,000 students, including 10,000 graduate students, making it the sixth largest university in the United States. The student body includes 26% African American, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian or Alaskan Native students, as well as approximately 5,000 international students from 130 countries. Texas A&M ranks among the top universities nationally in total research expenditures per year.

Qualified applicants should submit as attachments a letter of application that outlines their vision for the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research, a curriculum vitae, and contact information for five references to Glasscocksearch@tamu.edu. In order to preserve confidentiality, references will not be contacted without permission of the applicant. Application review will begin on December 15, 2016 and will continue until the position is filled. Our goal is to make an appointment no later than September 1, 2017, though this may be negotiable. Inquiries are welcome in advance of a formal application. Questions regarding the position or application process can be directed to Larry J. Reynolds, Search Committee Chair, at Glasscocksearch@tamu.edu.

Texas A&M University is an AA/EOE employer and committed to building a culturally diverse educational environment. Applications from women, minorities, and members of other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged and will be actively sought. The University is aware that attracting and retaining exceptional faculty often depends on meeting the needs of two careers and therefore implements policies that contribute to work-life balance.

Find out more

Call for Abstracts

The “Second International History of Medicine Symposium” is now accepting abstracts for their symposium which will be held February 24-25, 2017.  It’s goal is to highlight student research on the History of Medicine and related interdisciplinary areas  in both the sciences and the humanities. The program will include topnotch keynote speakers, awards for the best paper and poster in different categories, a reception, concerts, and a banquet. The venue will be TAMU HSC, College of Medicine, Bryan.

The Symposium is open to undergraduate, graduate/medical, and early post-graduate students at the Health Science Center College of Medicine, Nursing, School of Public Health, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine, One Health, Basic and Neurosciences, as well as Liberal Arts. Sessions can address a wide range of topics for a platform and/or poster presentation. Each student is expected to present an original critical interpretation and/or new methodological perspectives on the historical research topic. Faculty supervisors are encouraged to accompany their students.

The following link has more details about the format and submission process.
Call for Abstracts – History of Medicine Symposium

For further information, questions, or assistance with your topic, please contact russell@medicine.tamhsc.edu or alderete@medicine.tamhsc.edu

 

Call for Applications for Residential Fellowships

NATIONAL HUMANITIES CENTER
Residential Fellowships 2017-18

The National Humanities Center invites applications for academic-year or one-semester residencies. Fellowship applicants must have a PhD or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career as well as senior scholars from all areas of the humanities are welcome; emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work are also invited to apply. The Center does not normally support the revision of a doctoral dissertation. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. Fellows have private studies; the library service delivers all research materials. Scholars from all parts of the globe are eligible; a stipend and travel expenses are provided. The deadline for applications is October 18, 2016. http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/become-a-fellow/

The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.

Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award Call for Submissions 2016

The Cushing Memorial Library and Archives and The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research invite applications for the 2016 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award. This graduate research award, open to Texas A&M University graduate students in good standing, supports projects in the humanities that are based on collections housed at the Cushing Memorial Library and Archives. One or two awards of up to $2,000 each will be made.

Applications will be evaluated by a faculty committee and judged in part on their effective use of materials housed at Cushing. Recipients are expected to spend at least one month in residence at Cushing Library between 1 June and 31 August 2016, and they must deliver a short presentation on their projects during the fall semester of 2016. A written copy of the project must be deposited in the Glasscock Center Library.

Applications should be no longer than three single spaced pages, and they must contain the following information:

  • Applicant’s name, address, phone number and email address
  • Applicant’s major degree and department
  • Names of applicant’s department chair and committee chair
  • Applicant’s expected graduation date
  • Proposed project title
  • A statement describing the nature of the applicant’s research, its relationship to the humanities, and the materials at Cushing that will support the research
  • A tentative bibliography of Cushing materials

Submit applications via email to David Z. Choust in the form of an attached MS Word file or PDF (preferred) or to:

Cushing-Glasscock Humanities Research Award
c/o David Z. Chroust
Cushing Memorial Library & Archives
Texas A&M University
TAMU 5000
College Station, TX 77843-5000

Questions about papers and research can be directed to David Z. Choust.

Please note that a No-Repeat Rule applies:

  1. No one may receive more than one award in any three-year period.
  2. If a graduate student who has won the Cushing-Glasscock Award submits another proposal after the three-year period has passed, the new project must be significantly different from the previous one.

More information →

Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award Call for Submissions

The Cushing Memorial Library & Archives and Thethe Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research invite applications for the 2015 Cushing-Glasscock Graduate Award. This graduate research award is open to Texas A&M University graduate students in good standing. It supports projects in the humanities that are based on collections housed at the Cushing Memorial Library & Archives. One or two awards of up to $2,000 each will be made.Applications will be evaluated by a faculty committee and judged in part on their effective use of materials housed at Cushing. Recipients are expected tomust spend at least one month in residence at Cushing Library between June 1 and August 31, 2015, and they must deliver a conference-style presentation on their projects during the fall semester of 2015. A written copy of the project must be deposited in the Glasscock Center Library.Deadline for applications is Monday, March 30, 2015.Applications should be no longer than three single spaced pages, and they must contain the following information:

  • Applicant’s name, address, phone number and email address;
  • Applicant’s major degree and department;
  • Names of applicant’s department chair and committee chair;
  • Applicant’s expected graduation date;
  • Proposed project title;
  • A statement describing the nature of the applicant’s research, its relationship to the humanities, and the materials at Cushing that will support the research;
  • A tentative bibliography of Cushing materials.

Submit applications via email to David Z. Chroust (d-chroust@library.tamu.edu) in the form of an attached MS Word file or PDF or to:

Cushing-Glasscock Humanities Research Award
c/o David Z. Chroust
Cushing Memorial Library & Archives
Texas A&M University
TAMU 5000
College Station, TX 77843-5000


Please note that a No-Repeat Rule applies:

  1. No one may receive more than one award in any three-year period.
  2. If a graduate student who has won the Cushing-Glasscock Award submits another proposal after the three-year period has passed, the new project must be significantly different from the previous one.

 

Questions about papers and research can be directed to David Z. Chroust at 979-845-1951 and d-chroust@library.tamu.edu.

Announcement and Call for Interest for “Making Sense: handwriting and print” Symposium

We write to announce our planned symposium “Making Sense: handwriting and print,” which will be held 17-18 October 2014.

This two-day symposium will explore the ways handwriting, print, and the body work together to make sense, intellectually and physically. Today, we often hear debates about whether the printed page will become an outmoded technology replaced by the digital, supposedly in the same way that print replaced handwriting. Historically, however, handwriting and print have shaped each other, and usually involve working in a variety of media; Aldus Manutius (1449-1515), for example, based the font he used on his 1503 edition of Virgil on his own italic writing, while the double-column format, the red letter highlights, and the enlarged capital letters that start chapters in many modern Bibles continue the conventions used in medieval manuscripts. Even today’s electronic texts that are “born digital” rely on multiple conventions and techniques borrowed from both handwriting and print to make sense to the viewer/reader visually, emotionally, and intellectually.

The task of this symposium is to bring together a variety of practitioners of contemporary book arts and scholars of handwriting, print, and textual production to think about the many ways that media work together, whether in cooperation or in competition for our attention. Our goal is to complicate the too-simple understanding of new media based an idea of “replacement” by looking historically, interdisciplinarily, and cross-culturally at the many ways in which media interact. “Making Sense” will bring together six experts–including creators and designers at work in multiple media as well as scholars of paleography, graphic novels, and British, American, and Japanese literatures–to present plenary addresses. (See brief descriptions of our invited speakers below.)

We are also planning two roundtable sessions showcasing work being done at Texas A&M that intersects with the symposium topic. Roundtable participants will make brief presentations highlighting key elements in their research, followed by open discussion of shared questions and concerns with audience and guest speakers. We invite faculty, staff, and graduate students who would like to make 8-minute roundtable presentations to let us know of their interest by submitting a working title and brief description, not to exceed 250 words. Please send these by 31 May to any one of us; contact us with queries at any time.

Margaret J.M. Ezell, Department of English
Mary Ann O’Farrell, Department of English
Todd Samuelson, Cushing Library


“Making Sense: handwriting and print”
A symposium at Texas A&M University
17-18 October 2014

INVITED SPEAKERS
Dr. John Bidwell — Astor Curator of Printed Books and Bindings, Morgan Library & Museum, New York, N.Y. He has published extensively on American papermaking and nineteenth-century book arts and is presently curating an exhibition of Henri Matisse’s illustrations of James Joyce’s Ulysses.

Dr. Vera Camden — Professor of English at Kent State and Clinical Assistant Professor Psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University. In addition to publications on seventeenth-century English spiritual narratives, she works on contemporary “auto-graphic” narratives by writers/artists including Alison Bechdel.

Dr. Ellen Gruber Garvey — Professor of English, New Jersey City University Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance (2013) which looks at making meaning through scrapbooking by women and African Americans during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Dr. J. Keith Vincent — Toyota Visiting Professor, University of Michigan and Associate Professor of Japanese, Boston University. Author of Two-Timing Modernity: Homosocial Narrative in Modern Japanese Fiction (2012), he translated the Lacanian critic Saito Tamaki’s study of Japanese anime and “otaku” culture, Beautiful Fighting Girl (2011), and is working on a study of the early twentieth century genre of literary sketching called “shaseibun.”

Julian Waters — calligrapher and type designer, he has designed alphabets for Adobe, custom lettering for Barry Moser’s Pennyroyal Caxton Bible, logos for the US Postal Service, and was the typographic advisor to Maya Lin, who designed the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Dr. Heather Wolfe — Curator of Manuscripts, Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington D.C. She has edited multiple volumes focusing on early modern English handwritten texts, including The Pen’s Excellencie (2002) and “hybrid books,” personalize mixtures of print texts and handwritten ones, The Trevelyon Miscellany of 1608 (2007).