Natalia Molina Receives the Seventeenth Annual Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship

molina_howraceismadeThe Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research at Texas A&M University has awarded the Seventeenth Annual Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship to Natalia Molina, Professor of History and Urban Studies at the University of California, San Diego, for her book How Race is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts, published by the University of California Press in 2014.

Professor Molina’s work lies within the intersections of race, gender, culture, and citizenship. Molina received the Noris and Carol Hundley book prize of the PCB-American Historical Association for her first book, Fit to be Citizens? Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879-1939. Professor Molina earned her PhD from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She serves as the Associate Vice Chancellor for Faculty Diversity and Equity at UC San Diego. She is a member on the board of Cal Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities, a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians. Molina recently concluded a five-year term on the American Quarterly, the flagship journal in American Studies, editorial board.

In her second Glasscock prize-winning book, How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts, Molina examines Mexican immigration—from 1924, when immigration acts drastically reduced immigration to the U.S. until 1965, when many quotas were abolished—to understand how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed. During these years Molina concludes that an immigration regime emerged to define racial categories that influence perceptions of Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity in the United States.

How Race is Made in America is a groundbreaking study of a century of immigration policy that illuminates the ways in which citizenship is constructed and labor is controlled so as to create and maintain racial hierarchy. One reader stated that How Race is Made in America offers a compelling and cogent historical account of the racialization of Mexicans and Mexican Americas in the context of multiple processes of “racing” minority groups in the United States.

Professor Molina will receive the award and present a lecture on Wednesday, February 24, 2016, at 4 p.m. in the Glasscock Center Library, Room 311 of the Glasscock Building on the campus of Texas A&M University.

The Susanne M. Glasscock Humanities Book Prize for Interdisciplinary Scholarship was endowed in December 2000 by Melbern G. Glasscock, Texas A&M University Class of ’59, in honor of his wife.  Together, among many other generous gifts to Texas A&M University, they provided a naming endowment for the Center
in 2002.

For more information about the Glasscock Book Prize, please visit http://glasscock.tamu.edu/programs/bookprize.