Glasscock Center Announces Internal Faculty Residential Fellows for 2014-15

The Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research has named four recipients of Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellowship for the 2014-2015 academic year. Recipients of the four annually awarded fellowships receive a one-course teaching release in the fall or spring semester of the fellowship year, a $1,000 research bursary, and an office in the Glasscock Center for the fellowship semester. These fellows will present and participate in the Faculty Colloquium Series during their fellowship semester.

Olga Dror is an associate professor in the Department of History. While in residence during the spring 2015 semester, Professor Dror will work on her monograph Raising Vietnamese: Youth Identities in North and South Vietnam during the War (1965-1975). This book considers the war-time problem of preserving Vietnamese identity in a new generation in a country flooded not only with foreign soldiers but also with foreign culture. It also poses a broader question about the importance of identifying who or what was considered an enemy of the Vietnamese. While youth are important for any society, their often unacknowledged role increases when a society is under stress, as it is through their participation in the present that the future is made. Consequently, bringing children into historical analysis is a way to understand what is most important in how adults think of the possibilities of their own lives. Professor Dror’s examination of youth identities during war time Vietnam will fill a significant gap in the pre-existing literature, offering new perspectives on the impact of American culture and the war on Vietnamese national identity.

Susan Egenolf is an associate professor in the Department of English. During her fall 2014 semester residence, Professor Egenolf will complete her monograph Josiah Wedgwood and the Cultivation of Romantic Taste. This book examines the contributions of Josiah Wedgwood, a master potter and entrepreneur, to the construction of late-eighteenth century and early nineteenth century aesthetics, and it argues that Wedgwood’s wares and his methods of marketing them influence the rise of neo-classicism and notions of the picturesque in British literature and art. The argument of this project depends heavily on illuminating the cultural and political contexts of Wedgwood’s life and work by uncovering specific historical details and artifacts related to that work, and this interdisciplinary study employs aesthetic theory, thing theory, gift theory, and art history to frame that argument. In the field of eighteenth century studies, this book will be the first extended study of the symbiotic relationship between Wedgwood’s methods and products and the literary productions of the late eighteen century.

Linda Radzik is a professor in the Department of Philosophy. During her spring 2015 semester residence at the Glasscock Center, Professor Radzik will finish her monograph, titled Moral Bystanders: On the Social Enforcement of Morality, which focuses on a common set of moral problems in order to explore deeper issues about the nature of responsibility and the meaning of community. The problem centers around a particular character—the moral bystander—who witnesses a wrongful act. While the moral bystander judges the act to be wrong, she is neither the perpetrator nor the victim, and she has no authority with regard to the situation. What should she do? What is she permitted to do? What might she be required to do? Using the standard methodology of analytic moral theory, Professor’s Radzik’s work poses a challenge to prevailing views about moral responsibility, and suggests that many of our practices for holding one another responsible are neither well understood nor justified. By considering the justification of informal, social forms of punishment and systematically addressing the role played by third parties to conflicts, this book will contribute in new ways to the literature on the issues that arise in the aftermath of wrongdoing.

Shelley Wachsmann is a professor in the Department of Anthropology. While in residence in the spring 2015 semester, Professor Wachsmann will continue researching and editing a book-length final excavation report on his work at Tantura Lagoon, Israel. This site and its surroundings have been inhabited almost continually for the past 4,000 years, and it has proven to be an ideal environment for shipwreck archaeology of the ancient world. The report, titled Dor/Tantura Lagoon: The Ancient & Medieval History of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea Written in Shipwrecks, will detail the findings of three extensive seasons of underwater exploration in Tantura Lagoon. The book-length report is envisioned as an innovative hybrid excavation report that will include a book linked to an open-access companion website allowing readers to explore the wrecks and artifacts in situ on their computers. This book will contribute significantly to our knowledge of Mediterranean history and archaeology, particularly during the critical period of the mid-first millennium AD.

The Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellows will discuss work completed during the fellowship in the Glasscock Center’s Morning Coffee Hour in in the 2015-16 academic year. The Glasscock Center accepts applications for Glasscock Internal Faculty Residency Fellowships each spring semester. Applications will be accepted again in spring 2015 for the 2015-2016 academic year. For further information visit http://glasscock.tamu.edu/grants-funding or contact the Glasscock Center at glasscock@tamu.edu or (979) 845-8328.